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Fire Kills Campaigns

Cooking fire

Safety first for summer cooking

With the summer holidays in full swing, many children across the Isle of Wight will be spending more time in the kitchen.

But whether they’re lending a hand or simply seeking a snack, it’s important to make sure that they know the hazards of a hot hob.

So as part of the Fire Kills campaign, the Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service, is asking parents and carers to make any kitchen activities a chance for kids to learn this summer.

Trevor Moyce, Prevention and Protection Manager said: “From bake-offs to barbecues, there are lots of creative ways to teach kids about cooking fire safety this summer. And, it’s absolutely vital that they know what to do if the worst should happen.

“So alongside the melting, mixing and making, why not take the chance to pass on your fire safety know how? Test your smoke alarm as part of the activity. And remember, never leave a child alone with a hot hob, and help keep them safe by moving matches and saucepan handles out of their reach.”

And the kids don’t have to be in the kitchen to change the way you work in the summer - Distraction while cooking is a main cause of fire call-outs right across the country. 

Trevor Moyce continued: “Half of all accidental fires in the home start in the kitchen - often because of distractions like phone calls or family. So whatever happens elsewhere in the house, always make sure you have one eye on the hob or oven.

The Fire Kills campaign’s top tips for staying safe in the kitchen this summer are:

  • Take care if you need to leave the kitchen whilst cooking. Take pans off the heat or turn them down to avoid risk.
  • If a pan catches fire, don’t take any risks – Get Out, Stay Out, and Call 999.
  • Double check the hob is off when you’ve finished cooking. Keep tea towels and cloths away from the cooker and hob.
  • Take care if you’re wearing loose clothing – this can easily catch fire.
  • Avoid leaving children in the kitchen alone when cooking. 
  • Keep matches and saucepan handles out of their reach to keep them safe.
  • Take care with electrics - leads and appliances away from water and place grills and away from curtains and kitchen rolls.
  • Keep your equipment clean and in good working order.  A build up of fat and grease can ignite a fire.
  • Don’t cook after drinking alcohol.
  • Hot oil can catch fire easily - be careful that it doesn’t overheat.
  • Never throw water on a chip pan fire.
  • In the event of a fire, have an escape plan in place.
  • Don’t take risks by tackling a fire. Get out, stay out and call 999.
  • Get a smoke alarm and test it weekly.

Fire Safety Outdoors

Summer's here!  Have a great time and keep safe...

Barbecues

In recent years there have been a number of fatalities and injuries as a result of people bringing BBQ's into enclosed spaces and being overcome by carbon monoxide.  Carbon monoxide is a highly poisonous substance which is created when fossil fuels such as gas and solid fuels like charcoal and wood fail to combust fully due to a lack of oxygen.  You can't see it, taste it or smell it, but it can kill quickly with no warning.

  • Enjoy yourself, but don't drink too much alcohol if you are in charge of the barbecue or any cooking!
  • Keep a bucket of water, sand or a garden hose nearby for emergencies.
  • Follow the safety instructions provided with disposable barbecues.
  • Never use a barbecue indoors.
  • Never use petrol or paraffin to start or revive your barbecue; use only recognised lighters or starter fuels on coal.
  • Never leave a barbecue or any cooking unattended.
  • Make sure your barbecue is well away from sheds, fences, shrubs or garden waste.
  • Empty ashes onto bare garden soil, not into dustbins or wheelie bins.  If they're hot, they can melt the plastic and start a fire.

For more information on carbon monoxide safety, please click here .

For more information on barbecue safety, please click here .

For more information on fire safety outdoors, please click here .

Camping

When you are going camping, follow these basic precautions to reduce the risk of fire starting and spreading:

  • Never use candles in or near a tent - torches are safer.
  • Before you set off, get the contact details of the local fire and rescue service.
  • Set up tents at least six metres apart and away from parked cars.
  • Make sure you know what the fire arrangements on the camp site are and where the nearest telephone is.
  • Don't smoke inside a tent.
  • Place your cooking area well away from the tent.
  • Keep your cooking area clear of items that catch fire easily ('flammable' items), including long, dry grass.
  • Put cooking appliances in a place where they can't easily be knocked over.
  • Keep matches, lighters, flammable liquids and gas cylinders out of the reach of children.
  • Have an escape plan and be prepared to cut your way out of your tent if there is a fire.

For more information on carbon monoxide safety, please click here.

For more information on fire safety outdoors, please click here .

Boat Safety

Fire can spread quickly on a boat, even on water.  Alarms and detectors can help keep you and your crew safe.

  • Make sure you check and maintain your boat's fuel, gas and electrical systems on a regular basis.
  • Make an emergency plan with everyone on board before you set out.
  • If in doubt, don't fight a fire yourself.  Get out, stay out and wait for the fire and rescue service.

For more information on boat safety, please click here.

For the Fire Safety on Boats publication, please click here

Caravans

Having a working smoke alarm when you're staying in a caravan is just as important as having one in your home. 

  • Ensure caravans and tents are at least 6 metres apart and away from parked cars.
  • Make sure you know what the fire arrangements on the camp site are and where the nearest telephone is.

Inside the caravan:

  • If you smoke, use metal ashtrays - and never smoke in bed.
  • Don't leave children alone inside.
  • Don't block air vents - if any leaking gas builds up you may fall unconscious and be unable to escape.
  • Turn off all appliances before you leave the caravan to go to bed.
  • Never use a cooker or heater whilst your caravan is moving.

If there's a fire in your caravan:

  • Get everyone out straight away.
  • Call the fire and rescue service and give your location with a map reference, if possible, or provide a nearby landmark, like a farm.

For more information on carbon monoxide safety, please click here.

For more information on fire safety outdoors, please click here .

How to reduce the risk of wildfire

Dry ground in the summer means there's an added risk of a fire starting, but you should take care at all times of the year.  Follow these tips to reduce the chance of a wildfire in the countryside:

  • Extinguish cigarettes properly and don't throw cigarette ends ont he ground - take your litter home.
  • Never throw cigarette ends out of car windows.
  • Avoid using open fires in the countryside.
  • Don't leave bottles or glass in woodland - sunlight shining through glass can start fires (take them home and recycle them).
  • Only use barbecues in a suitable and safe area and never leave them unattended.
  • If you see a fire in the countryside, report it to the fire and rescue service immediately.
  • Don't attempt to tackle fire that can't be put out with a bucket of water - leave the area as quickly as possible.

For more information on fire safety outdoors, please click here .

In the countryside

Every year, fire destroys thousands of acres of countryside and wildlife habitats.  Some fires are started deliberately, but most are due to carelessness.

  • Put out cigarettes and other smoking materials properly before you leave your vehicle.
  • If you see a fire in the countryside, report it immediately.
  • Avoid open fires in the countryside.  Always have them in safe designated areas.
  • If you can, prepare for the arrival of the fire and rescue service at the pre-arranged meeting point, by unlocking gates etc.

The Countryside Code applies to all parts of the countryside.  Most of it is just good common sense, designed to help us all to respect, protect and enjoy our countryside.

The Code, updated in 2012, makes it clear what the responsibilities are for both the public and the people who manage the land. It has information about rights, responsibilities and liabilities and how we all have a duty to protect the countryside.  Together with common sense, it helps to make it easy for visitors to act responsibly and identify possible dangers.

For more information on the Countryside Code, please click here .

For more information on fire safety outdoors, please click here .

Sky lanterns

We recommend that you do not use sky lanterns as you have no control over them once they've been set off.  They can kill animals, litter the countryside and can even start fires.  If you do choose to set them off, always follow the manufacturers' guidance/instructions carefully.

For more information on fire safety outdoors, please click here .

On the first of every month, test your smoke alarms

Last year over 200 people died in fires in the home. You are more likely to die in a fire in the home if there is no working smoke alarm.  So on the 1st of every month, test your smoke alarms and tick it off your 'to do' list.  It takes no time at all and gives you and your family a better chance of surviving a fire.

First of the month - Time to Test.  

Social Media

For more information on fire safety, please visit the following social media sites:

www.facebook.com/firekills

firekills.tumblr.com/

audioboo.fm/FireKills

Or follow Fire Kills on twitter.com/fire_kills 

    #CookSafe

    #BBQSafety

    #CarefulCooking

Watch the 'Don't drink and fry' campaign on Youtube, please click here

Watch the 'Hot Date' campaign on Youtube, please click here