19 Dec 2016 Last updated at 10:00

Oh Christmas tree

Real Christmas trees are recyclable, however artificial ones are not. The council, in partnership with Amey are offering free special kerbside collections of real trees in January.

The collection of real trees will take place on the same day as your recycling and green garden waste collections. We can only collect trees that are seven feet or under - if you have a larger tree simply cut it down and book as two trees. No more than two per booked collection please, we need to make room for every one.

Bookings will need to be made three working days in advance of the collection to allow scheduling time. Last bookings must be made by 6pm on Tuesday 31 January. Bookings made after this date will not be valid. Terms and conditions will apply.

The collection service will be available between 2 January and 3 February 2017 but must be booked at least three working days in advance. To book a collection, contact (01983) 823777 or use the Christmas tree online form via www.iwight.com/householdwaste


When booking a collection, please remember the following:
• If your next recycling day is on a Monday, book your green garden waste collection by 6pm on Wednesday.
• If your next recycling day is on a Tuesday, book your green waste collection by 6pm on Thursday.
• If your next recycling day is on a Wednesday, book your green waste collection by 12 noon on Saturday.
• If your next recycling day is on a Thursday, book your green waste collection by 6pm on Monday.
• If your next recycling day is on a Friday, book your green waste collection by 6pm on Tuesday.

Once you have requested your Christmas tree to be collected, please leave it next to your green wheeled bin/gull sack by 7am on your recycling collection day.

Don’t forget:
• natural trees only;
• trees must be clear of decorations and free of pots/planters.

What can I do with an artificial tree?
Due to the combination of materials used to make an artificial tree you are unable to recycle it. If you have room, you can reduce waste by packing it up and saving in a loft, shed or garage for next year! However, if you can’t store it and it is in good condition, you could ask friends and family if they want it, advertise it on an exchange website or donate it to charity.

Boughs of holly
Is your home a natural winter wonderland filled with boughs of holly, hanging mistle toe and garlands made from pine cone and fir branches? Don’t forget that natural Christmas decorations made from live plants can be home composted to reduce waste.

The decorative parts of the wreath such as ribbons, plastic flowers and berries and the oasis ring/base can be used again. You might like to keep these bits handy and have a go at making a lovely table decoration for your home in the Spring or another wreath next Christmas.

All that sparkles…
Festive fairy lights bring magic and sparkle to the Christmas party, but what to do with them when they are no longer working? Waste electronic and electrical equipment can be recycled at Lynnbottom or Afton Marsh Household Waste Recycling Centre, just ask to be directed to the correct recycling area.

Tinsel is not recyclable. If your tinsel has finally lost its sparkle and needs to be thrown away - it needs to be disposed of in your rubbish bin.
 
Top ten Christmas tree facts

1. The first officially decorated tree was in Riga, Latvia in 1510.
2. Recycled trees have been used to make sand and soil erosion barriers.
3. Artificial trees last approximately six years in your home but for centuries in landfill.
4. An acre of Christmas trees provides the daily oxygen requirements of 18 people.
5. Since 1947, the tree in London’s Trafalgar Square has been a gift each year from the city of Oslo, Norway.
6. Real Christmas trees came eighth in a survey of the nation’s favourite smells in 2004, just behind the sea but ahead of perfume.
7. Manufactured Christmas tree ornaments were first sold by Woolworths in 1880.
8. England’s first Christmas tree was brought to Windsor by Charlotte, wife of George III, in 1800.
9. The trees brought in the 1840s by Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria, led to their popularity throughout the UK.
10. The first use of the term ‘Christmas tree’ in English was in 1835.

*Christmas tree image courtesy of www.wrap.org.uk

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Real tree collection begins January.
Real tree collection begins January.
Factfile
  • Last bookings must be made by 6pm on Tuesday 31 January 2017.
  • Bookings will need to be made three working days in advance of the collection to allow scheduling time.
  • The collection service will be available between 2 January and 3 February 2017.
 
Isle of Wight, UK